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TsooRad is a blog for John Weber. John is a Lync Server MVP (2010-2013). My day job is titled "Principal Consulting Engineer" - I work with an awesome group of people at CDW, LLC. I’ve been at this gig in one fashion or another since 1988 - starting with desktops (remember Z-248’s?) and now I am in Portland, Oregon. I focus on collaboration and infrastructure. This means Exchange of all flavors, LCS/OCS/Lync, Windows, business process, and learning new stuff. I have a variety of interests - some of which may rear their ugly head in this forum. I have a variety of certifications dating back to Novell CNE and working up through the Microsoft MCP stack to MCITP multiple times. FWIW, I am on my third career - ex-USMC, retired US Army. I have a fancy MBA. One of these days, I intend to start teaching. The opinions expressed on this blog are mine and mine alone.

2009/05/13

The Black Swan

Started reading “The Black Swan” by Nassim Nicholas Taleb (whoever he is).  This item hit my reading list because of a recommendation regarding (believe it or not) BCDR (Business Continuity/Disaster Recovery) discussions in a recent training event.

The “hired gun” was pontificating (and doing very well, I might add) at some BCDR point, when, out came a reference to this book.

I try hard to learn from everything I do; I also admit that I have severe shortcomings in this area - but I work on it.  So when this pontificator spouted this BCDR drivel, I wrote down the name of the book, and we moved on.  However, by the end of the session, I had added the book to my shopping cart on Amazon.

Two reasons.  Numero Uno, Andrew Ehrensing (the hired gun) impressed the hell out of me - if he thought this book was worth reading, maybe there was something to it.  Number 2, the guns’ soliloquy made a tremendous amount of sense - I intend to make reference to it the next time I am in front of a customer. Ergo, I needed to at least skim the material so I could nominally refer to it.

Wow.  I just finished the prologue.  If the rest of this book is as good as the opening, then this is a real gem.

Thank you Andrew!